Société Réaliste

Antarctica, 2007-2011

Antarctica

Société Réaliste



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enamelled steel plate

2007-2011

Ferenc Gróf

Iceberg, 2017

Iceberg

Ferenc Gróf



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giclée print mounted on Dibond

2017

Société Réaliste

UN Camouflage, 2011-2012

UN Camouflage

Société Réaliste

Société Réaliste is an artists' cooperative founded in 2004 by Ferenc Gróf (1972) and Jean-Baptiste Naudy (1982) and active until 2014. Central to their activities is the exploration, subversion and deconstruction of the specific devices of visual communication that have been developed and employed by institutions, governments and rulers, i.e., the representatives of power – in the fields of religion, politics, culture, art and finance – so as to position themselves. By exploring the representative and aesthetic roles of these agencies – including signs, logos, maps, symbols, typefaces, landmarks, emblems, statues or even buildings – in complex contexts of much broader time and space, the artists place them in a new light in the form of a “political cabinet of curiosities”, a critical, narrative implementation of design.

Using a pattern software, Société Réaliste has systematically converted national flags of the United Nations member states into camouflage patterns, while respecting the original colour tones and proportions. From Afghanistan to Zimbabwe, flags lose progressively their link to identity representation, while remaining strangely familiar. Ideological, political or cultural particularities are melted into a common shape, the one of camouflage. There are various way to produce a camouflage effect, in biology as much as in textile, the main one being called with the Greek term « crypsis » (« hidden »), and characterized by a combination of colorations blending with their background. If the colours of the nations are symbolic of their national conception, then their camouflage version should harmonize with their colorimetric atmosphere.

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Digital print mounted on Dibond

2011-2012

Agnes Denes

Isometric Systems in Isotropic Space – Map Projections: The Egg, 1976

Isometric Systems in Isotropic Space – Map Projections: The Egg

Agnes Denes

”Denes’s series titled Isometric Systems in Isotropic Space – Map
Prpjections, 1973-79, is a set of drawings in which the globe of
Earth is altered into various forms. The Earth is re-envisioned a
spiraling snail’s shell, a pyramid, a cube, an ovoid (lemon shape),
a hot dog (a sphere elongated in one direction), a dodecahedron,
an egg spahe, a droplet, a doughnut. All the forms are topological
transformations of the original sphere of the Earth – each is
a topological equivalent of the sphere.”

Marc Daniel Cohen: The Paradox of Eco-Logic in Agnes Denes. Art for the Third Millenium –
Creating a New World View, exhibition catalogue published by Ludwig Museum – Museum of
Contemporary Art, Budapest, 2008

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Four-color lithograph on Rives BFK paper

1976

Agnes Denes

Isometric Systems in Isotropic Space – Map Projections: The Snail, 1976

Isometric Systems in Isotropic Space – Map Projections: The Snail

Agnes Denes

”Denes’s series titled Isometric Systems in Isotropic Space – Map
Prpjections, 1973-79, is a set of drawings in which the globe of
Earth is altered into various forms. The Earth is re-envisioned a
spiraling snail’s shell, a pyramid, a cube, an ovoid (lemon shape),
a hot dog (a sphere elongated in one direction), a dodecahedron,
an egg spahe, a droplet, a doughnut. All the forms are topological
transformations of the original sphere of the Earth – each is
a topological equivalent of the sphere.”

Marc Daniel Cohen: The Paradox of Eco-Logic in Agnes Denes. Art for the Third Millenium –
Creating a New World View, exhibition catalogue published by Ludwig Museum – Museum of
Contemporary Art, Budapest, 2008

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Four-color lithograph on Rives BFK paper

1976

Agnes Denes

Tree Mountain - A Living Time Capsule - 11,000 Trees, 11,000 People, 400 Years (Triptych) 1992-1996, 1992/2013

Tree Mountain - A Living Time Capsule - 11,000 Trees, 11,000 People, 400 Years (Triptych) 1992-1996

Agnes Denes

A huge manmade mountain measuring 420 meters (1370 feet) long, 270 m (886 feet) wide and 38 meters (125 feet) high in elliptical shape was planted with eleven thousand trees by eleven thousand people from all over the world at the Pinziö gravel pits near Ylöjärvi, Finland, as part of a massive earthwork and land reclamation project by Denes. The project was officially announced by the Finnish government at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro on Earth Environment Day, June 5, 1992. 
Tree Mountain is the largest monument on Earth that is international in scope, unparalleled in duration, and not dedicated to the human ego, but to benefit future generations with a meaningful legacy. 

Tree Mountain is a collaborative, environmental project that touches on global, ecological, social and cultural issues. It tests our finitude and transcendence, individuality versus teamwork and measures the value and evolution of a work of art after it has entered the environment. Tree Mountain is designed to unite the human intellect with the majesty of nature. Eleven thousand trees are planted by the same number of people according to an intricate pattern derived from a mathematical formula.

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C-print

1992/2013

Károly Kismányoky

Sand pit (with Kálmán Szijártó), 1970

Sand pit (with Kálmán Szijártó)

Károly Kismányoky



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silver gelatin print on Docubrom paper mounted on cardboard

1970

Sándor Pinczehelyi

Imagination (For the proposal of László Beke), 1971

Imagination (For the proposal of László Beke)

Sándor Pinczehelyi



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gelatin silver print, collage mounted on fibreboard

1971

Károly Kismányoky

Forest - Scales of narrow white stripes / Thick white stripe along the horizontal line (with Kálmán Szijártó), 1970

Forest - Scales of narrow white stripes / Thick white stripe along the horizontal line (with Kálmán Szijártó)

Károly Kismányoky



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silver gelatin print on Docubrom paper mounted on cardboard

1970

Károly Kismányoky

Untitled (Footsteps), 1976

Untitled (Footsteps)

Károly Kismányoky



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silver gelatin print on Docubrom paper

1976

Kálmán Szijártó

Sun Path, 1975

Sun Path

Kálmán Szijártó



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silver gelatin print

1975

Máté Dobokay

TAIE No. 7, 2014

TAIE No. 7

Máté Dobokay

Máté Dobokay’s body of conceptual artworks pushes the boundaries of photography: they uncover the inner structures, raw materials, chemical and physical components of photography, often without a camera and as a result of lengthy research experimentation. In his analytical pieces, the paper, the photographic substances, and the chemical reactions all serve as tools of artistic examination.

In the series of TAIE images Dobokay focuses on the concept of monochrome photography by dissolving the traditional genre of landscapes. He takes the “empty” recordings exposing without using lens, thus, spectacle here is dissolved with the help of an intentionally malfunctioning camera – which after all is a haphazard pinhole camera.

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giclée print mounted on Dibond

2014

Máté Dobokay

TAIE No. 4, 2014

TAIE No. 4

Máté Dobokay

Máté Dobokay’s body of conceptual artworks pushes the boundaries of photography: they uncover the inner structures, raw materials, chemical and physical components of photography, often without a camera and as a result of lengthy research experimentation. In his analytical pieces, the paper, the photographic substances, and the chemical reactions all serve as tools of artistic examination.

In the series of TAIE images Dobokay focuses on the concept of monochrome photography by dissolving the traditional genre of landscapes. He takes the “empty” recordings exposing without using lens, thus, spectacle here is dissolved with the help of an intentionally malfunctioning camera – which after all is a haphazard pinhole camera.

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giclée print mounted on Dibond

2014

Máté Dobokay

TAIE No. 5, 2014

TAIE No. 5

Máté Dobokay

Máté Dobokay’s body of conceptual artworks pushes the boundaries of photography: they uncover the inner structures, raw materials, chemical and physical components of photography, often without a camera and as a result of lengthy research experimentation. In his analytical pieces, the paper, the photographic substances, and the chemical reactions all serve as tools of artistic examination.

In the series of TAIE images Dobokay focuses on the concept of monochrome photography by dissolving the traditional genre of landscapes. He takes the “empty” recordings exposing without using lens, thus, spectacle here is dissolved with the help of an intentionally malfunctioning camera – which after all is a haphazard pinhole camera.

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giclée print mounted on Dibond

2014

Imre Bak

Untitled, 1973

Untitled

Imre Bak



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silver gelatin print, collage

1973

Imre Bak

Village No. 3, 1974

Village No. 3

Imre Bak



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gelatin silver print, collage

1974

Sándor Pinczehelyi

Example of growing 4 sq m blue grass - documentation, 1973/75

Example of growing 4 sq m blue grass - documentation

Sándor Pinczehelyi



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chromogenic print

1973/75

Sándor Pinczehelyi

Line drying I., 1980

Line drying I.

Sándor Pinczehelyi



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gelatin silver print on Docubrom paper

1980

Sándor Pinczehelyi

Star (Stone-pit), 1972

Star (Stone-pit)

Sándor Pinczehelyi



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gelatin silver print

1972

Agnes Denes

Wheatfield - A Confrontation: Battery Park Landfill, Downtown Manhattan - Blue Sky, World Trade Center, 1982

Wheatfield - A Confrontation: Battery Park Landfill, Downtown Manhattan - Blue Sky, World Trade Center

Agnes Denes

Probably Agnes Denes's best-know work, Wheatfield – A Confrontation (1982) stands as a visionary and transgressive act, a monument to identify misplaced priorities questioning controversial global issues and
endless contradictions, in which she planted, grew and harvested a two-acre area of wheat on a landfill facing Wall Street and the World Trade Center.

”Wheatfield was a symbol, a universal concept. It represented food, energy, commerce, world trade, economics. It referred to mismanagement, waste, world hunger, and ecological concerns. It was an intrusion into the Citadel, a confrontation of High Civilization. Then again, it was also a Shangri-la, a small paradise, one’s childhood, a hot summer afternoon in the coutnry, peace, forgotten values, simple pleasures.

The idea of a wheat field is quite simple. One penetrates the soil, places one’s seed of concept, and allows it to grow, expand, and bear fruit. That what creation and life is all about. It’s all so simple, yet we tend to forget basic processes. What was different about this wheatfield was that the soild was not rich loam but dirty landfill filled with rusty metals, boulders, old tires, and overcoats.”

Agnes Denes in Art for the Third Millenium – Creating a New World View, exhibition catalogue published by Ludwig Museum – Museum of Contemporary Art, Budapest, 2008

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C-print

1982

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